The Dependent Triangle
Lonesome Star Farm was created for 2 reasons: 1) To promote heritage livestock’s beneficial characteristics as an excellent alternative to commercial livestock in temperament, meat quality, their ability to graze on grass which lessons (or almost removes) costly feed bills, and are more tolerant to weather extremes & disease. 2) As an example of sustainability using this Dependent Triangle.

3 Parts of “The Dependent Triangle”:

1) Heritage Livestock-  Raise heritage & rare livestock that are 100% grass-fed or including some organic grain and high protein hay. Lonesome Star Farm currently has Kunekune pigs which are a hearty medium-sized pig whose heritage quality means they are typically disease resistant so no harmful antibiotics are used and they forage for their own food. Unlike other pigs, Kunekune pigs can fatten on grass alone thereby saving the homesteader significant amounts of money each year. They’re temperament is very friendly, they’re gentle on fences, and their ability to fatten on grass alone is increasing their popularity grow each year even though they have not been bred in the USA until the last 10 years for the most part. Last, versatile Kunekune genetic strains offer beautiful pets as well to complement many types of homestead operations. With just a few big corporations using just a few types of pigs for the nation’s food supply, the time is now to diversify with a natural and tastier alternative to this monoculture business model.

2) Native Grass/Hay – Kunekune pigs won’t thrive without a healthy free range field to frolic in containing ample organic hay or ideally native grasses. Lonesome Star Farm carefully maintains a balance between the livestock’s need to graze the grass and keeping our 80+ year old native pasture from becoming a West Texas dust bowl. Native grasses are important for they are disease resistant & drought tolerant.

3) Lonesome Star Farm is mentioned last of the 3 parts for God creates the livestock and germinates the seed so we just orchestrate it all.  Just to name a few other things we do is plant rye seed as a green cover crop for the winter and enjoy the art of  breeding.  Our goals centers around cultivating a stout and disease resistant animal for “pasture” use while balancing their lard pig characteristics to add more muscle to the “plate” side of their multi-purpose uses.

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